YouTube is a video service currently owned by Google and founded by three former PayPal employees, Chad Hurley, Steve Chen, and Jawed Karim. It is among the most popular online video sites as of June 2017,[1] and has received much attention by individuals of all ages. This page is dedicated to listing numbers which have significance in the YouTube community.

Class 1

  • 301: Before August 2015 a YouTube video would freeze at 301 views in an effort by YouTube to validate the views received on a video which becomes popular in the community. The matter is more fully explained in the Numberphile[2] video "Why do YouTube views freeze at 301?".[3] As an in-joke that YouTube appears to have made, the video happens to be "frozen" at 301 views, though by now it has received over 4.1 million.
  • 484,149: On YouTube videos that gain views extremely quickly, the views always freeze at around this weird number. Nobody really knows why this happens at this exact number as not many people even know that this happens, but it does for the same reason that the views used to freeze at 301 - to validate views. After up to a few hours however, the views return to their actual amount.

Class 2

  • 1,281,750: Most subscribers ever gained in 1 day by a channel, record achieved by Tati.
  • 3,100,000: Approximate number of likes of the most liked YouTube comment, record achieved by Seth Everman.
  • 108,000,000: Approximate number of subscribers of the most subscribed YouTuber, PewDiePie.
  • 109,000,000: Approximate number of subscribers of the most subscribed YouTube category, Music.
  • 165,000,000: Approximate number of subscribers of the most subscribed channel, T-Series
  • 264,742,039: Most views ever gained in 1 day by a channel, record achieved by Cocomelon.
  • 7,500,000,000: The approximate view count of the "Baby Shark" music video, which is currently the video with the biggest number of views. This is a dynamic googologism and may be subject to change.[4]
  • 136,691,274,228: The approximate total video views of the most viewed channel on YouTube, T-Series
  • 73,786,976,294,838,206,464: The number of different eleven-character video ID's. The derivation is as follows:
    There are 64 possible characters to choose from for each character, (52 for lowercase and uppercase English letters, 10 for the digits zero through nine, and 2 for a hyphen, -, and an underscore, _).
    There are 11 characters in total, therefore the number of possible video ID's is \(64^{11}\), or 73,786,976,294,838,206,464.

Informative YouTuber Tom Scott[5] has uploaded a video entitled "Will YouTube Ever Run Out Of Video IDs?",[6] which presents the preceding derivation in a slightly longer way.
  • 22,300,745,198,530,623,141,535,718,272,648,361,505,980,416: The number of different 24-character channel ID's. The derivation is as follows:
    There are 64 possible characters to choose from for each character, as explained in the prior proof.
    There are 24 characters in a channel-ID, therefore there are \(64^{24}\) possible channel-ID's.

Sources

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