This page contains numbers appearing in pop culture.

Bee Movie-related numbers

A screenshot from the Bee Movie.

According to all known laws of googology, there is no way large numbers should be able to be derived from seemingly unrelated aspects of pop culture. The mathematical experience of the average person is just too small to get their contrived examples of large numbers up to any significant size. The average person, of course, does this anyway because the average person doesn't care what googologists think is impossible.

Class 1 numbers

  • 173: The word "bee" appears 173 times in the script for the Bee Movie.
  • 55,314: The number of characters found in the Bee Movie script.

Class 2 numbers

  • 17,673,825,551: The numerical value of the bijective base-26 number \(beemovie\), given that \(a=1\), \(b=2\), \(c=3\), and thus forth.
  • 8,672,172,482,000,000,000,000,000,000: The approximate length of "The entire Ice Age pentalogy but every syllable is replaced with the entire Toy Story trilogy but every second the color green is in frame it is replaced with every video ever uploaded on YouTube but every 10 seconds every episode of The Simpsons plays but every word with a vowel is replaced with the Bee Movie but every time a bee is shown it is replaced with every episode of SpongeBob played backwards" in years, as calculated by MatPat as of Feb. 10, 2017. Since new videos are constantly being uploaded to YouTube, the "current length" would actually qualify as a dynamic googolism.
    • It is 20x bigger than the age of the universe in nanoseconds. According to the video, if you tried to fill all of earth's oceans with an eyedropper at a rate of one drop (or one milliliter) for every 5000 years, it would still take less time than to watch the video.

Minecraft-related numbers

Screenshot from the game Minecraft.

Minecraft is a sandbox building game which the player interacts with and transforms the surrounding environment of cubes as they see fit. It has gained popularity due to the very large number of possible structures that can be built in the game with only a few block types, making it like a huge online Lego box.

The following list is comprised of numbers related to Minecraft, and a brief description after each number to explain it's significance.

Class 1 numbers

  • 16: There are 16 pixels to the edge of a standard block in Minecraft using the default texture pack.
  • 256: The default build height limit in blocks of a Minecraft world.
  • 1,536: The number of pixels visible on the surface of a standard block in Minecraft using the default texture pack.
  • 4,096: The amount of cubic pixels in a single Minecraft block using the default texture pack.
  • 65,536: The number of blocks contained in a normal Minecraft chunk with a default build height limit.

Class 2 numbers

  • 12,550,821: Prior to Minecraft version Beta 1.8 there would generate layered terrain in stark contrast to the normal terrain after one journeyed 12,550,821 blocks from the X/Y coordinate (0,0) on either the X or Y axis. These were called the Far Lands and were removed later in the game.
  • 30,000,000: Prior to Minecraft version Beta 1.8 the game would generate 'fake chunks' beyond this limit on the X/Y axis that the player could no longer stand on.
  • 268,435,456: The number of cubic pixels in a Minecraft chunk counting air blocks, using the default texture pack, and with a default build height limit.
  • 2,147,483,647: Past this limit blocks will not be rendered and the game will crash if the player attempts to manually traverse this limit.
  • 262,144,000,000,000,000: This is the number of interactive blocks in a Minecraft World, including air blocks and assuming a normal height limit.
  • 2 × 1022: Dream's number - the odds of getting 211 out of 305 blaze rod drops from blazes, and 42 out of 262 ender pearl trades from piglins, in Minecraft 1.16.1.[1]
  • (2128)-(2103)-1: The highest value that a block's hardness can have.[2]
  • 21,024 (approx. 1.79769313486 × 10308): This is the true height limit of Minecraft, for beyond this point the game will not consider your position on the Y-axis as a valid number. Here is a video in which the height limit is discussed.
  • 236,864 (approx. 1.47 × 1011,097): The number of unique possible textures for a single block in a 16x16 texture pack. This number has been derived with the knowledge there are 1,536 pixels to fill in and each pixel can have 1 out of 16,777,216 possible colors from the hex color palette.
  • 7.46 × 10244,700: The approximate number of possible chunks naturally generated in the Minecraft world, excluding entities.

Class 3 numbers

  • 2.63 × 1010,275,621,677,278,468,246: The approximate number of unique Minecraft worlds that can be built in creative mode (this includes the Nether and the End realms).[3] This number is in between an attillion and a zeptillion.
  • 1010215: The number of different placements of blocks in every Minecraft world possible. Known as a Minecraftplex.

Pokémon-related numbers

This page contains large numbers that are relevant to the Pokémon series.

Class 1 numbers

  • 4,096: The odds, one against, of encountering a shiny Pokémon under normal circumstances in Gen 6 or 7.
  • 8,192: The odds, one against, of encountering a shiny Pokémon under normal circumstances in the first 5 generations.[4]
  • 65,536/3 (21,845.33333333...): The odds, one against, of a Pokémon contracting Pokérus by itself.[5]
  • 600,000: The level 100 experience of some Pokémon.
  • 800,000: The level 100 experience of some Pokémon.
  • 999,999: The maximum number of Pokémon Dollars in the player's wallet in generations 1 to 4.

Class 2 numbers

  • 1,000,000: The level 100 experience of some Pokémon.
  • 1,059,860: The level 100 experience of some Pokémon.
  • 1,250,000: The level 100 experience of some Pokémon.
  • 1,640,000: The level 100 experience of some Pokémon.[6]
  • 9,999,999: The maximum number of Pokémon Dollars in the player's wallet in generations 5 to 7.
  • 481,266,036: The most damage that can possibly be dealt in one hit.[7]
  • 3,945,136,128: The number of possible spot patterns for Spinda, assuming that spots entirely off-sprite do not count.
  • 4,294,967,296: The number of possible spot patterns for Spinda, assuming that spots entirely off-sprite still count.
  • 148,718,980,881: The number of possible Smeargle movesets.
  • 681,951,284,585,619,281,459,292,458,037,774,643,200: The number of PkHexable pokemon.

Mario-related numbers

Class 2 numbers

  • 1012,431: An estimation for the amount of playable and fun levels that can be made in Mario Maker.[8] This number is known as a Marioplex, and was coined and created by YouTube user Matthew "MatPat" Patrick. It was created using Fermi estimation.
  • 1.8 × 1012,444: The number of levels that can be created in Mario Maker.[8] This number has no official name. It was created by YouTube user Matthew "MatPat" Patrick.

Uno-related numbers

Uno is an American shedding-type card game that is played with a specially printed deck. The game's general principles put it into the Crazy Eights family of card games, and it is similar to the traditional European game Mau-Mau.

The list below considers an infinite and equally distributed deck of Uno and several variants of the game.

Class 0 numbers

  • 1: When you have only one card, you must speak Uno.
  • 2: There is a card that makes the opponent draw two cards ("+2" or Draw 2).
  • 4: There is a card that makes the opponent draw four cards ("+4" or Wild Draw 4).

Class 1 numbers

  • 7: Number of cards in initial hand of each player.
  • 54: In Classic Uno, there are exactly 54 different cards
    • 10 numeric cards (0-9) with 4 different colors = 40.
    • 1 "+2" card with 4 different colors = 4.
    • 1 skip card with 4 different colors = 4.
    • 1 reverse card with 4 different colors = 4.
    • 1 Wild card = 1.
    • 1 "+4" or Wild Draw 4 = 1.
  • 58: In Uno Rabbids, there are exactly 58 different cards
    • Same as Classic Uno = 54.
    • 1 Comin' Through card = 1.
    • Explosive Results card = 1.
    • Hurry Up! card = 1.
    • Wild Blue Yonder card = 1.

Class 2 numbers

  • 1,338,925,209,984: Number of possible first hands in Classic Uno.
    • There are 7 cards in first hand and 54 different cards, then 547.
  • 2,207,984,167,552: Number of possible first hands in Uno Rabbids.
    • There are 7 cards in first hand and 58 different cards, then 587.
  • 1,792,720,717,930,698,493,280,256: Total number of first hands combinations between 2 players.
    • \((54^7)^2\) = 5414.
  • 4,875,194,084,160,298,409,672,704: Total number of first hands combinations between 2 players in Uno Rabbids.
    • \((58^7)^2\) = 5814.
  • 3.2 × 1048: The approximate number of first hands combinations between 4 players.
  • 2.3 × 1049: The approximate number of first hands combinations between 4 players in Uno Rabbids.
  • 1.8 × 10121: Disregarding the fact that someone can win/lose in Uno, you have approximately this chance of all 2 players (including you) in this example, coming up with 7 "+4"s and play them over and over until they both have no cards in hand. The remaining player must draw the number of cards and all cards drawn must be "+4" s.
  • 3.4 × 10242: Disregarding the fact that someone can win/lose in Uno, you have approximately this chance of all 4 players (including you) in this example, coming up with 7 "+4"s and play them over and over until all 4 players have no cards in hand. The remaining player must draw the number of cards and all cards drawn must be "+4" s.

Miscellany

Class 2 numbers

  • 14,000,605: The number of futures Doctor Strange searched in Avengers: Infinity War.[9]
  • 600,000,000: The area in square miles of "The Backrooms", as described by the original 4chan post.[10]

Sources

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